Loading...

Summer Study

Are you considering taking courses at Duke this summer? You're in the right place. All students are considered for up to two terms of summer financial aid (the equivalent of one full summer).

Summer Costs

In this section you'll find the costs for Summer 2022 at Duke and at the Duke University Marine Lab.

Why do these matter? To determine your aid (see below), we use the formula Cost of Attendance - Expected Family Contribution = Need. Cost of Attendance is also called "total costs," and it's the sum of your expected costs for a term. You can use this section on summer costs to find out what your total costs would be.

To find out your total costs, add the tuition costs for the number of courses you'll be taking to the sum of the other expenses.

**Please note that for Summer 2022, we are using the costs below for all students taking courses on Duke's main campus, regardless of whether they will be living on or off campus. We will also not be increasing costs/aid if a student chooses a more expensive summer on-campus room.

 

TuitionCost
Laboratory course$3,325
Non-lab course$2,600
1/2-credit class$1,300
1/4-credit class$650

 

Other ExpensesCosts
Student Health Fee$151
Student Services Fee$131
Housing$1,718
Dining$1,089
Books$179
Personal Expenses$494

Total of Other Expenses: $3,762

To find out your total costs, add the tuition costs for the courses you'll be taking to the sum of the other expenses.

 

TuitionCost
Laboratory course$3,325
Non-lab course$2,600

 

Other ExpensesCosts
Room & Board$3,504
Activity Fee$75
Health Fee$151
Books$200
Personal Expenses$494

Total of Other Expenses: $4,424

 

 

Loading...

"How much will a summer session cost me after I receive financial aid?"

You'll subtract your summer family contribution from your total costs to find out how much financial aid you'll receive. Please keep in mind that your summer aid will include a $500 loan and $450 of work study. Use the steps below!

Step 1: Determine your summer family contribution.

To do this, find your academic year parent contribution in DukeHub under "Financials." Divide your academic year parent contribution by 4. (The summer session family contribution is 25% of the academic year parent contribution.)

  • For Summer 1, use your academic year parent contribution for the previous year
  • For Summer 2, use your academic year parent contribution for the upcoming academic year. (You'll need to have your financial aid application in and complete to receive Summer 2 aid!)

Step 2: Add up all the costs that apply to you (see "Costs" above). These will include your tuition expenses, as well as expenses for housing, books, etc.

Step 3: Subtract your summer session family contribution from your total costs for your summer session. This is how much total aid you'll receive.

Then, subtract $950 from your total aid, because your award will include a $500 loan and $450 of work study. This is how much grant aid you'll receive. 

 

You can now add up all the charges billed by Duke (tuition and fees, plus housing and dining, if you're living on campus). Subtract your grant aid from this number. This is how much you'll owe once your grant aid is applied.

"Can I see some examples?"

Julie has an academic year parent contribution of $10,000 for the previous academic year, and she is taking classes at Duke in Summer 1.

Her summer family contribution will be $2,500 (25% of $10,000). 

Julie will be taking one lab course. Her total costs for Summer 1 will be $3,325 (tuition for one lab course) + $3,762 (other expenses). This adds up to $7,087.

$7,087 (total costs) - $2,500 (summer family contribution) = $4,587. Julie will receive $4,587 in total aid, of which $500 will be a loan, and $450 will be a work-study award. The rest will be grant aid.

Therefore her grant aid for the summer term will be $3,637.

Julie will be living on campus, so most of Julie's expenses will be billed directly by Duke. These will be $3,325 (tuition for one lab course) + $282 (fees) + $1,718 (housing) + $1,089 (meal plan). Her total bill (before financial aid) will be $6,414. Her grant aid will reduce this by $3,637, so her resulting bill to pay would be $6,414 - $3,637 = $2,777.

Nathan has an academic year parent contribution of $20,000 for the previous academic year, and he is taking classes at Duke in Summer 1.

His summer family contribution will be $5,000 (25% of $20,000). 

Nathan will be taking two non-lab courses. His total costs for Summer 1 will be $5,200 (tuition for two non-lab courses) + $3,762 (other expenses). This adds up to $8,962.

$8,962 (total costs) - $5,000 (summer family contribution) = $3,962. Nathan will receive $3,962 in total aid, of which $500 will be a loan, and $450 will be a work-study award. The rest will be grant aid.

Therefore his grant aid for the summer term will be $3,012.

Nathan will be living off campus, so he could expect to be billed for only tuition and fees. These will be $5,200 (tuition for two non-lab courses) + $282 (fees). His total bill (before financial aid) will be $5,482. His grant aid will reduce this by $3,012, so his resulting bill to pay would be $2,470.

 

Catherine has an academic year parent contribution of $40,000 for the upcoming academic year, and she is taking classes at the Duke Marine Lab in Summer 2.

Her summer family contribution will be $10,000 (25% of $40,000). 

Catherine will be taking one lab course. Her total costs for Summer 2 will be $3,325 (tuition for one lab course) + $4,424 (other expenses). This adds up to $7,749.

Catherine's family contribution for the summer session ($10,000) is higher than her total costs ($7,749), so she would not be eligible for grant aid during this term, with these expenses.

Have additional questions?

Visit our Summer Study FAQs to read frequently asked questions about financial aid for summer school.

Summer FAQs